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Copyright Week: Educational Resources want to be tinkered with

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(This post is part of Copyright week, during which a range of organizations highlights key principles that should guide copyright policy – right in time for the European copyright consultations. Please also read posts published previously on the CC blog: on the public domain and on Open Access. Today’s theme is “You bought it, you own it”).

It’s ever harder to tinker with things

We live in societies, in which equipment and gadgets are ever more often „black boxes”. As users and consumers, we don’t have access to their internals – we cannot fix them, adapt them, modify. Sometimes it’s an issue of having advanced technical skills, and sometimes of owning a really strange screwdriver that will fit proprietary screws. And companies differ in their approaches – with a spectrum running between gadgets that just won’t open, and those that allow a „do it yourself” approach.

With physical objects, we understand well what owning them means, and how much control over them we have. But the same issues of ownership and control apply to symbolic goods – the digital files and content streams through which we experience our culture, education and science. In their case, it’s easy to confuse ownership with mere possibility of access and use – but without real control. And copyright is the mechanism that determines the extent of your ownership of a work.

What about digital files?

Some aspects of what you can do with digital files are determined by technology. You chose „copy”, but nothing happens the digital management system, defined by the seller, has just kicked in and limited your rights as an owner. But copyright choices made in license agreements, as well as general rules of copyright, are just as important. Even if you can copy a file, you might still be committing a crime.

True ownership of works in digital formats faces today many challenges. The shift to cloud computing, and concurrent rise of streaming services, significantly complicates the issue of our rights as users. Ever more often we access works that seem and feel as if they were really owned, but in fact are only made available to users as a service – with a very limited set of attached user rights, and with a reserved right of the content owner to cease the service at almost any moment.

How to give others the right to “tinker”?

But the opposite question can be asked – what can we do to provide users with rights, if we believe that cultural, educational or scientific works should be tinkered with, fixed, reused, recycled, copied and passed on to others?

At the technical level, all this can be done with files by virtue of their character as digital object: copying is error-free and costs practically nothing. Reuse is easy with a range of cheap or even free digital tools. The Net is an underlying infrastructure for sustainable and effective sharing. But things are more complicated at the legal level. Default copyright law makes digital content equivalent to physical objects that are meant to be carried – but lack handles; meant to be opened – but are fitted with non-standard screws. User rights are limited as they are by default reserved by rights-owners.

Open licensing, of the type that Creative Commons promotes, is a solution to this problem. For this reason, public policies need to address licensing, and not just technical or economic barriers to access to culture and knowledge. Many Open Access policies avoid licensing issues. They are still a huge step towards making culture, education or science available. But they stop short of giving us rights beyond access itself. This fact might have historic reasons, as Open Access to scientific research – as a movement – has a much longer track record than similar movements in culture or education. And in science, reuse of the research paper is not a significant stakes – one does not experiment with the scientific paper, but with formulas and materials described by it.

Educational resources want to be tinkered with

The case is very different with education, where educators work directly with content. The best of them tinker and reuse them in the process – and then have an urge to share with their peers. Similar arguments could be made with regard to culture, where what we now call a remix fit into a long tradition of artistic practise. The argument is in particular strong for public domain works – heritage that’s meant to be shared and used.

Makers, hackers and fixers teach us about the advantages of truly owning the things we have. And if you agree that we should be able to lift the hoods of our cars and fix them – then you should also care about real ownership of non-material good. This means caring about how copyright affects such ownership, and monitoring practices of commercial entities in this regard. But it also means open licensing of works – so that our education, culture and knowledeg is something that can be not just passively experienced, but tinkered with.

Gæsteblog: Seriously We Think Free Magazine – magasinet der rejser

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Vi giver af og til mikrofonen videre til danske projekter, som vælger at bruge Creative Commons værktøjerne til at bidrage med nye og spændende tiltag i de mange kreative miljøer man finder landet over. Denne gang det internationalt orienterede projekt Seriously We Think Free Magazine, som er sat i verden af de to ildsjæle Elina og Denica:

Vi har arbejdet hårdt i mere end et år og skabt et interaktivt livsstilsmagasin, der rejser. Det er en unik kombination af trykte medier og digitale teknologier. Brugere, læsere, kreative og almindelige mennesker skriver artikler til os, for at inspirere og uddanne læserne. Vi har håndplukket 25 artikler om musik, design, kunst, lavbudget-rejser, usædvanlige måder at leve på, håndlavede ting og madlavning. Magasinet er bæredygtigt og miljøvenligt, fordi det bliver delt: Efter at have læst det, er brugeren opfordret til at videregive det til en anden person, og kan samtidig spore det ved at bruge vores mobile platform til at se, hvor mange kilometer magasinet har været på rejse, og hvor mange personer der har læst det. Læserne har også mulighed for at deltage i konkurrencer og vinde spændende præmier.

Takket være Creative Commons kunne vi finde de forfattere og bloggere, der gerne vil dele deres artikler i vores magasin. Alle vores artikler og fotografier har Attribution-ShareAlike CC licens, så folk kan læse bladet, dele indholdet, give det videre til andre mennesker og fortælle om det. Da magasinet deles, gav CC os den bedste mulighed for at gøre en nyskabelse i forlagsbranchen.

Vi har netop vundet 1. pladsen i Copenhagen Business Startup Awards, og vi har endnu flere milepæle, vi planlægger at opnå i de følgende år. Det omfatter flere interaktive sider, spil i magasinet, sider som er forbundet med de sociale medier, bæredygtige ideer, til hvordan man kan indarbejde solceller i papiret, og afspille musik direkte fra siden. Tak til vores bidragsydere og entusiastiske tilhængere, ny-kommende forfattere og læsere, der har været med til at få det til at vokse – og skabe det verdens eneste magasin, der rejser.

Stay tuned for vores nyheder og interaktive real-time kort via vores hjemmeside: http://www.seriously-wethinkfree.com

Du kan også ‘like’ os på Facebook for at vinde nogle fantastiske godbidder eller downloade freebies: https://www.facebook.com/SeriouslyWeThinkFreeMagazine

Og sidst, men ikke mindst, kontakt os gerne i tilfælde af at du ønsker at bidrage – eller bare at sige ‘Hej!’. Vi kan fanges på følgende mail adresse: contact (a) seriously-wethikfree (dot) com.

The post Gæsteblog: Seriously We Think Free Magazine – magasinet der rejser appeared first on Creative Commons Danmark.

PLOS Announces Website Redesign

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PLOS is pleased to announce the redesign of PLOS.org, which completes phase two of our website overhaul. The new landing page now enables visitors to navigate more quickly and easily to the information they need. Highlights of the new site also include a rotating carousel of PLOS’ most recent announcements, a news feed and a featured article from our suite of journals.

Phase one of our overhaul  last year included updates to the journal websites. We are always looking to improve. Please send PLOS feedback as you navigate the new site. Comments are welcome at feedback@plos.org. Thank you for supporting PLOS and its mission to transform research communication.

The post PLOS Announces Website Redesign appeared first on The Official PLOS Blog.

PLOS Welcomes CC v4.0 Licenses

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PLOS has been using the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license for almost 10 years as the default for the research that it publishes. On November 25, 2013, Creative Commons unveiled the next generation of open licenses to support the sharing of content. The new licenses are the result of an open community process with stakeholders from a wide range of domains, including research, education, and the creative arts, and PLOS is proud to have been involved in the effort to make the licenses work for researchers.

Two aspects of the Version 4.0 licenses are particularly important for researchers because they address issues that could have made reuse of published research more cumbersome. Firstly, the re-use rights for data within an article are made clearer and more consistent between different countries and regions.

Second, the licenses provide flexibility on attribution. This is important for research, and particularly for text and data mining, where a multitude of articles might be analyzed together. It doesn’t make sense to list every paper analyzed with each and every search result. It does make sense to link from each result to a page recognizing all the contributions. The new licenses still absolutely require attribution but allow all attributions to a large corpus to be collected together.

Another important aspect of the new licenses is that they combine the experience of several years of developing localized license variants into one international license, ensuring global compatibility and ease of use for all researchers, wherever they may be based.

PLOS will be publishing new articles under CC BY v4.0 beginning in mid-December for PLOS ONE and from January 1, 2014 for all other PLOS journals.

The CC BY license has long been an important part of realizing our aim, of creating the largest possible pool of accessible, re-usable and interoperable research content possible. Open Access is about more than content being free to read; it must also be free to re-use, and re-combine, not just with other articles, but with all forms of research information. The new version of the Creative Commons licenses, the global standard for web based content, is an important part of the toolkit for making that vision possible.

The post PLOS Welcomes CC v4.0 Licenses appeared first on The Official PLOS Blog.

Letter to the Editor of Science, by Elizabeth Marincola

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The following ‘letter to the editor’ was submitted to Science October 4, 2013 and was published on Sciencemag.org December 5, 2013.

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John Bohannon’s News story “Who’s afraid of peer review?” (special section on Communication in Science, 4 October, p. 60) incriminates many Open Access (OA) journals. Our journal, PLOS ONE, was not implicated. It rejected the fraudulent paper promptly and for the right reasons, as Bohannon acknowledges. Still, the “study” was disappointing: It was not controlled, which would have required seeking to entrap a matched set of closed-access journals, yet it claims that a source of the problem is open access. It then concludes that profitability for OA journals is driven by volume, without acknowledging that the same is true for closed-access journals.  The issues raised by Bohannon’s exercise are not about open access journals; they are about science and technical publishing and the peer review processes used throughout the industry.

In the short term, all scientific publishers have a responsibility to reinforce and strengthen pre-publication review. We must improve the efficiency of peer review and continue to perform checks that uncover conflicts of interest, identify financial disclosures, confirm author affiliations, and ensure compliance with international standards of animal and human testing.

Even with these tools, peer review will never be flawless. As Editor-in-Chief Marcia McNutt points out, it is “time-honored” and “the gold standard” (Editorial, p. 13), but that doesn’t mean our methods of evaluation can’t and shouldn’t be improved. This is the real challenge. And this is why PLOS is working to transform scientific communication by developing better measures of scientific quality both before publication (currently traditional peer review) and after publication (currently the dreaded impact factor).

To this end, PLOS is developing Article Level Metrics (ALMs) that enable the scientific community itself to confer on a research contribution its credibility, relevance, and importance, independent of the journal in which it is published. Peer review at its best is a continual process of critique and assessment.

Elizabeth Marincola

Chief Executive Officer, The Public Library of Science, San Francisco, CA 94111, USA. E-mail: emarincola@plos.org

The post Letter to the Editor of Science, by Elizabeth Marincola appeared first on The Official PLOS Blog.

Council of the EU discusses OER, but is vague on details

European Open EDU Policy Project -

The Council of the European Union, comprised of Ministers of member states, debated last week on the topic „Open Educational Resources and digital learning.” The debate was held during the meeting of the Education, Youth, Culture and Sport Council on the 25-26th of November.

The meeting was related to the Commission’s „Opening Up Education” initiative, which was launched at the end of September and in which the development of OER policies plays a key role. Yet the scope of debate at the Council meeting was broader, and didn’t seem to be well connected to the “Opening Up Education” project. The Council did not provide a written conclusion on the matter. Based on limited available information (see the minutes of the meeting, p. 10), it seems that the Council focused primarily on broad issues related to digital learning and MOOCs (which are drawing significant attention from the public as well as policy makers).

Similarly, the brief position paper prepared by the Lithuanian Presidency, titled „Presidency Discussion Paper: Open Educational resources and digital learning”, does not provide a substantial viewpoint on OER. It lists advantages and challenges, and suggests that „time is ripe for a debate at European level on the opportunities and challenges which Open Educational Resources will undoubtedly bring”.

The „Opening Up Education” communication provides a much stronger view of OER as advantageous for education in Europe. It’s good news that representatives of the Ministries of Education are discussing OERs. But if the Council meeting is treated as a sample, there is still much work needed at the national level, so that policymakers are provided with a clear sense of the benefits of open education and the role of OERs within digital learning frameworks.

(Short report from the meeting is available on the Open Education Europa portal).

Entry icon image:”Education, Youth, Culture and Sport Council press conference”, CC BY, Open Education Europa

 

Creative Commons lancerer ny international version af licenserne

CC Danmark -


Den 26. november var en stor dag. Efter mere end 2 år på udviklingsstadiet, udgave den internationale organisation Creative Commons (som Creative Commons Danmark udgør den lokale afdeling af) nemlig version 4.0 af Creative Commons licenserne.

Det betyder at du nu kan besøge Creative Commons’ website og forny din licens – hvis du ønsker at bruge den nye internationale standard (hvilket dog ikke betyder at de danske licenser, som har version 2.5 ikke stadigvæk er brugbare). Fordelene ved at bruge de nye licenser kan du læse mere om nedenfor.

De nye version 4.0 licenser afspejler mere end nogensinde før den styrke som ligger i det globale Creative Commons fællesskab. Henover de seneste 6 år har CC’s internationale hovedkvarter arbejdet med hundredevis af frivillige over hele verden – bl.a. med nogle af klodens skarpeste professionalle advokater og jurister indenfor ophavsrettighedslovgivning og åben licensering – for at oversætte og tilpasse CC licenserne til lokale forhold i mere end 60 lande (herunder Danmark). I løbet af den proces er mange erfaringer blevet indsamlet om hvordan det internationale rettighedslandskab for licenser hænger sammen.

Det er derfor version 4.0 er den internationalt set mest håndhævelige udgave af licenserne der nogensinde er blevet udviklet. Version 4.0 vil derfor ikke blive oversat og tilpasset til hvert enkelt land som de tidligere udgaver. Den virker bare. Overalt.

Disse licenser er et symbol på den dedikation og diversitet som Creative Commons communitiet verden over rummer; et community som du automatisk tilslutter dig når du bruger et CC-licenseret værk eller licenserer ét selv. Så vi kan allesammen være stolte af hvad vi har skabt sammen!

Læs mere om frigivelsen af de nye licenser på Creative Commons internationale blog, og overvej samtidig at give Creative Commons en julegave i form af en donation.

The post Creative Commons lancerer ny international version af licenserne appeared first on Creative Commons Danmark.

Sign up today to have Amazon donate to PLOS

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Now when you shop with Amazon, via AmazonSmile, 0.5% of eligible purchases can be donated to PLOS, at no cost to you.

PLOS will direct proceeds from this program to support authors who are unable to pay all or part of their publication fees.

Sign up today to help PLOS remove barriers to participation in Open Access publishing.

Remember: PLOS only benefits when you purchase through smile.amazon.com (not amazon.com). Initially you select “Public Library of Science” as your charitable organization and it should autoload on each visit.

The post Sign up today to have Amazon donate to PLOS appeared first on The Official PLOS Blog.

Beyond Wikiwijs: OER and The Netherlands

European Open EDU Policy Project -

(This guest post is written by Lisette Kalshoven from Kennisland)

The Netherlands has been a strong OER (Open Educational Resources) country since 2008 when the report on Education and Open Educational Resources was released by the Education Council. Because of the advice given in the report, the OER platform Wikiwijs was created to help teachers navigate through OER content and create their own. This was an enormous step forward in the world of OER. However, it has not proven to be the revolution in educational resources that some had hoped.

(Graphic: „De schoolmeester” by Bernardus van Schijndel (fragment), Public Domain work from the Rijksmuseum online collection).

What the Dutch issues are

Although the platform Wikiwijs (now: www.wikiwijsleermiddelenplein.nl) gave teachers the opportunity to use, share and create (Open) Educational Resources, this is not enough to change the way we in The Netherlands produce and use educational resources. This is due to the bigger issues surrounding OER in The Netherlands:

1. Strong regulations on educational material

In the Netherlands there are strong governmental regulations on what is high enough quality material to be taught in our schools. There are standardised tests in the final years of high school and learning materials developed especially to train students for the test. It is therefore very difficult for a teacher to develop OER material that completely fits the government profile.

2. Who is paying for it?

The teachers are worried about the OER approach because they are afraid that content creation is going to be piled up on top of their regular workload. Who is going to pay for the time they spend on developing their own teaching materials? Are some much-needed hours for grading being allocated for work on OER platforms, or should teachers consider it a hobby and work on this in their free time?

3. Teachers do not understand copyright

Ignorance about copyright is abundant in society, teachers not excluded. Even if teachers create new materials they often do not have the know-how to license it so that their fellow teachers can use it legally. And if they are aware that they have copyright on the materials they create (or use), there is an Education exception in the Dutch copyright law which adds up to the confusion.

4. Wrong financial incentive

The Dutch government gives schools earmarked money to use for schoolbooks. That is why schools can’t use this money for anything else but books. Parents do not care about the pricing of schoolbooks because they do not feel like they are paying for the books themselves. Cost-saving discussions therefore will only be fruitful at a national level.

What do we have to do?

We can do a lot to entice people to make more use of OER. There is much to be gained with an awareness programme for schools throughout the country. A lot of teachers already have the intention to create OER but are not aware of the possibilities and restrictions caused by not licensing them appropriately. We need to make OER more bottom-up than top-down.

Also, a lot of ground can be gained by taking the discussion back to the national level. Though OER was a priority for the Dutch Government in the late noughties, it seems to have withered substantially with the new minister(s) of education. If we can take some of the enthusiasm for OER present at the EU level (propagated by my fellow Dutchperson Neelie Kroes) back to the national debate, maybe we can solve bigger issues such as the earmarked schoolbook money and the time allocation for teachers.

New UNESCO report on OER in Poland

European Open EDU Policy Project -

New country report on Open Educational Resources in Poland has been published by the Institute of Information Technologies in Education UNESCO (IITE). „Open Educational Resources in Poland: Challenges and Opportunities” ( PDF) is a review of projects and policies of public institutions and non-governmental organisations. The report is written by Karolina Grodecka ( e -Learning Center of AGH University of Science and Technology) and Kamil Śliwowski (Digital Center).

The study covers public (top-down) ICT and OER initiatives in public education as well as non-governmental (bottom-up) OER projects and initiatives like open education evangelism and lobbing actions. Publication focuses a lot on the story of the Polish Coalition of Open Education, a unique coalition of NGOs and public institution that has been a significant force supporting open education in Poland.

Just as important is the Digital School program, the first nationwide program that will provide, among other elements, a complete set of open school textbooks for all school levels and subjects. Both projects are characteristic of the Polish OER field and have drawn international interest over last years. Especially the Digital School program, which among its three components includes open textbook production – the smallest, but also most challenging and ontroversial component. Two years of consultations did not end the critique from commercial educational publishers, who mostly boycotted the program.

The report furthermore demonstrates another significant challenge faced by both public and non-governmental projects (besides the biggest, like the Polish Wikipedia or the very popular public domain digital library wolnelektury.pl) – they struggle to draw the interest of  teachers. Lack of public, systematic support for teachers and NGO projects that would help implement and sustain the creation and dissemination of resources is one of most important barriers for wide OER implementation.

Despite the language barrier, Poland in last years became very active in the OER area, both „importing” projects and resources from English-speaking countries (there is Polish foundation running Khan Academy translations and making their own videos) and exporting some ideas. Coalition for Open Education and Creative Commons Poland are trying to show best practices form Poland and some projects like edukacjamedialna.edu.pl are starting to create second language versions of their resources.

The report (PDF), has been published as part of a series on OER that previously included overviews of the state of OER in Brazil, China, Lithuania and Russia. The report was prepare in co-operation with authors’ affiliate institutions (AGH University of Science and Technology and Centrum Cyfrowe Projekt: Polska), and the Polish Coalition for Open Education.

State of OER Policy in Romania

European Open EDU Policy Project -

With this post we’d like to initiate a series of overviews of OER Policy developments in Europe. We are starting with a post about Romania, written by Valentina Pavel from the Association for Technology and Internet (ApTI).

To start the discussion about OER in Romania, we actually have to talk about copyright. People in general have little knowledge about copyright and licences…not to mention OER. Therefore, in Romania we need to focus on information and awareness campaigns targeted at decision-makers, educators, parents as well as pupils and students. At the same time, there is a sense of shyness and reluctance when it comes to approaching this new subject and people hardly stop to grasp and internalize its advantages. Consequently, OER is not yet perceived as a new business model and is considered as a threat to the publishers’ market.

OER without even realizing it

didactic.ro is what I would have liked to refer to as a good practice example. The website (available in Romanian) is an online teacher’s community and the biggest Romanian portal with educational resources for all K12 classes, including technical and vocational education. There are nearly half a million registered members and around 190 000 available resources. Whether there are teaching plans, exercises, extra-curricular activities, literary comments or exam notes and materials, teachers, parents and pupils have the possibility to use, share, comment and benefit from the available resources. There’s only one catch here… what’s missing in this example is for the materials to have an open licence. Although nobody minds if the materials are used, distributed and remixed, it’s not exactly legal from the copyright law perspective. Hopefully, it’s only a matter of time until we will be proud to add diddactic.ro to the list of CC wonderful case studies.

Side talk: Digital textbooks with a very light touch of OER

There is a hot debate going on about digital textbooks for 1st and 2nd grade textbooks, however the legislative proposals do not mention copyright issues. When it comes to the format of the textbooks, NGOs are trying to channel the discussions towards having open textbooks. Therefore, we have to hope for political willingness to extent the idea of OER to digital textbooks. It  would be a great opportunity for the Romanian educational system. The Ministry of Education is currently working on a web page (www.manuale.edu.ro) where all the digital textbooks are going to be freely available for download. We are waiting for more info on this and to see how this project will be implemented, what type of format is going to be used and under what licences.

The first policy breakthrough

In its strategic national governmental plan for 2013-2016, the Romanian government mentioned for the first time Open Educational Resources and the integration of IT methods for learning. The strategic plan states that the Romanian Government, together with the Ministry of Education, will ‘support innovative methods for integrating web 2.0 educational resources and open educational resources in the learning process’. At the same time, this governmental plan is backed up by the European Open Data initiative and by signing the Open Government Partnership in 2011. In conjunction to this, the National Education Law mentions a Virtual Library and an e-Learning platform. However, there are no norms as to how this law should be applied.

In short, the progress is slow, but at least there are some policy and legislative texts to fall back on and to give decision-makers a sense of direction.

A step forward

A strong civil movement is starting to take shape regarding OER and open licences in a more broader sense. There are several NGOs who usually partner up and work together in these kinds of open initiatives. The most recent example is a project on OER organized together by ApTI (The Association for Technology and Internet), Kosson, ANBPR and Soros Foundation. In the next months they are going to organize 4 workshops in 4 different cities in Romania and talk to librarians, academics and university staff about copyright issues, open licences and OER. They launched this project at the national librarian’s conference in Sibiu which took place between 10-12 October. The first conclusions are that OER could definitely find its place amongst the projects librarians are designing and implementing all over the country for their local communities.

At the same time, there are other small initiatives such as an open legal education website that wants to make the legal language more accessible and empower people with information about their rights while promoting civil engagement. Although it is still under construction, we are hoping to see the beta version of the website some time at the beginning of next year.

I am looking forward for more initiatives and results in OER as the wave of curiosity is gradually starting to build up. More information on the OER situation in Romania will soon be available in a report written by the Soros Foundation some time by the end of this year.

ANNOUNCING THE RECIPIENTS FOR THE ACCELERATING SCIENCE AWARD PROGRAM

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The three award recipients for the Accelerating Science Award Program (ASAP)  were announced today in Washington, DC at the Open Access Week kickoff event hosted by the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) and the World Bank. ASAP recognizes the use of scientific research, published through Open Access, that has led to innovations benefiting society. Major sponsors include the Wellcome Trust, PLOS and Google.

From left: Carlos Rossel of The World Bank, Robert Kiley of Wellcome Trust, Daniel Mietchen, Alex Kozak of Google, Nitika Pant Pai, Elizabeth Marincola of PLOS, Matt Todd, Heather Joseph of SPARC (click photo to view)

 

 

 

 

 

 

The award recipients, along with the challenges they address and their innovative approaches, include:

  • Global Collaboration to Fight Malaria (Matthew Todd, PhD):  At least one child dies of malaria every minute of every day, mainly in Africa and Asia. According to Matthew Todd, who leads the Open Source Malaria Consortium, given minimal financial incentives for pharmaceutical companies to develop new treatments and a high degree of suffering among the affected communities, a large-scale and open collaborative research model provides a solution. Todd turned publicly available data into a global effort to help identify new anti-malaria drugs.  He did this by creating an open source collaboration involving scientists, college students and others from around the world. They use open online laboratory notebooks in which their experimental data is posted each day, enabling instant sharing and the ability to build on others’ findings in almost real time. 

“This recognition may help enlist more people into the collaborative effort to fight malaria,” said Dr. Matthew Todd. “If we succeed with these efforts, the approach could be extended to fighting other diseases – such as cancer.”

 

  • HIV Self-Test App Empowers Patients (Nitika Pant Pai, MD, MPH, PhD, Caroline Vadnais, Roni Deli-Houssein and Sushmita Shivkumar):  To increase awareness, knowledge and access to a convenient HIV screening option, and to expedite connections to treatment in nations hardest hit by the disease, Dr. Nitika Pant Pai and medical staff at McGill University and McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, developed a smartphone application as part of a self-testing strategy that synergized the Internet, an oral fluid–based self-test and a smartphone. This integrated approach included HIV education, an online test to determine HIV risk level, instructions to self-testing and interpreting the results, and confidential linkages and resources for referrals to trained counselors. The personalized smartphone application, developed on the basis of original research published in multiple Open Access journals, helps circumvent the social visibility associated with HIV testing in a healthcare facility. The application could alleviate fears of stigma and discrimination and make HIV detection simple, non-judgmental and confidential while empowering individuals with distilled scientific knowledge.

 

“Being an award recipient will help shine light on the fact that open access acts like a catalyst – by allowing unrestricted knowledge sharing – it exponentiates the power of knowledge to transform and impact lives beyond borders, boundaries, languages, and regions; facilitates creation of novel innovations, improved practices and policies,”  said Dr. Nitika Pant Pai. “With our synergistic innovation (application), we created a patient desired non-judgmental, private option that empowers proactive individuals to self-educate, stage, and seek linkages for HIV.”

 

  • Visualizing Complex Science (Daniel Mietchen, PhD, Raphael Wimmer and Nils Dagsson Moskopp): Many aspects critical to understanding science, experiments and the natural world are hard to convey using only words and diagrams. Good quality multimedia can help make that understanding easier. Daniel Mietchen and his group created the Open Access Media Importer (OAMI), a bot that can find and download supplementary multimedia files from reusably licensed Open Access research articles deposited in PubMed Central and uploads them to Wikimedia Commons, the media  repository used by the Wikipedias and their sister projects.  To date, the bot has uploaded more than 14,000 files that are being used in more than 200 English Wikipedia articles and many more in other languages that together garner about three million monthly views.

 

“We want people to play around with scientific materials and to engage with scientific processes,” said Dr. Daniel Mietchen. “Scientific research should play a more public role in our society, and open licenses greatly facilitate that. We are glad that the award highlights the value of reusing, revising, remixing and redistributing Open Access materials.”

As award recipients, these individuals and teams are being honored for addressing a real-world challenge by reusing previously published Open Access research to make a difference in science, medicine, business, technology or society as a whole.  Open Access is the free, immediate online availability of articles, coupled with the rights to use these articles fully as long as the author and the original source are properly attributed.

Photos and video interviews of the winning recipients and honorable mentions can be found at https://sites.google.com/site/asaptoolkit/ .  Additional information on ASAP can be found at http://asap.plos.org/

The ASAP program sponsors share a commitment to affect policy and public understanding to support the adoption of Open Access. They include the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL), the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), Co-Action Publishing, Copernicus Publications, Creative Commons, the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Doris Duke Charitable Trust, Electronic Information for Libraries (EIFL), eLife, Hindawi, Health Research Alliance (HRA), Howard Hughes Medical Institute, ImpactStory, Jisc, Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science, Mendeley, Microsoft Research, the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA), Research Councils UK (RCUK), Research Libraries UK (RLUK), Social Science Research Network (SSRN), the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), SURF (Netherlands), the World Bank, and major sponsors Google, PLOS and the Wellcome Trust.

The post ANNOUNCING THE RECIPIENTS FOR THE ACCELERATING SCIENCE AWARD PROGRAM appeared first on The Official PLOS Blog.

Professor Grant McFadden Joins PLOS Pathogens as Joint Editor in Chief

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PLOS is very pleased to announce that from October 7 2013, Professor Grant McFadden joined Professor Kasturi Haldar as joint Editor in Chief of PLOS Pathogens. Professor McFadden has been associated with PLOS Pathogens from its very beginning in 2005; he became deputy editor in October 2007.

Professor McFadden is based at the University of Florida where his work focuses on how viral pathogens interact with the host immune system.

Dr Virginia Barbour, Medicine Editorial Director for PLOS said “As Deputy Editor, Professor McFadden has been a tremendous advocate for PLOS Pathogens and has been core to developing PLOS Pathogens into the world class journal it is today. We are very pleased to now have him in this position of leadership with Professor Haldar and I Iook forward to working with him and Professor Haldar in the next stage of the journal’s development.”

Professor Haldar said “Grant functioned as a joint Editor in Chief, even as Deputy Editor, so I’m delighted we’ve formalized the situation. The Editorial Board and I would like to thank Grant for all he has done for PLOS Pathogens and look forward to his continuing leadership in the future.”

The post Professor Grant McFadden Joins PLOS Pathogens as Joint Editor in Chief appeared first on The Official PLOS Blog.

Even more journals display ALMs!

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In 2009, PLOS became the first (and remains the only) publisher to launch an open source Article-Level Metrics (ALM) app to help other publishers implement ALM on their journals. Now we are pleased to announce that two leading organizations are implementing ALMs using the PLOS open source app.

The Public Knowledge Project (PKP, provides software used by thousands of journals and hosting services to publishers like Co-Action Publishing) and Copernicus Publications (an innovative Open Access publisher) are both launching ALM programs based on the PLOS app.

ALM’s give publishers’ critical insight into the effectiveness of their programs, including highlighting articles that generate the most activity. Other publishers that have introduced ALMs include Biomed Central, eLife, Nature Publishing Group and PeerJ, among others.

Richard Cave, Director of IT for PLOS said “naturally PLOS is particularly gratified when ALMs spread to other journals because of the open source application that we built. PLOS welcomes all publishers who display ALMs because we believe in their power to transform the way research is assessed”.

Juan Pablo Alperin, who lead the development effort for PKP said “like PLOS, we believe that measuring article impact provides a deeper level of understanding about the influence of the work published in journals using our software. We encourage those using OJS systems to sign up for the free ALM service”.

Martin Rasmussen, managing director of Copernicus Publications added “we hope that more publishers will join this initiative and consider implementing it to enable direct comparison across journals”.

PLOS would like to extend a warm ALM welcome to these new journals; we hope these readers enjoy this new dimension to their service.

 

The post Even more journals display ALMs! appeared first on The Official PLOS Blog.

Reflections on our OER policy workshop in Berlin

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A week ago, the European Commission launched the “Opening Up Education” initiative, a proposal for modernizing the European educational system. The proposal contains a strong “open” component. We’re using this opportunity to strengthen open educational policies in Europe, and we started our project with a workshop in mid-September. Below you can learn about the outcomes of our workshop, including an overview of the OER landscape in Europe, concept for a policy brief, and ideas for policy-related activities.

(Cross-posted on the CC blog).`

The workshop took place 14-15 October as part of the German “OERde13” conference. The workshop marked the public launch of CC’s collaborative „Open Educational Resources Policy in Europe” project. Eleven OER experts from all over Europe met for two days to discuss the state of OER policies in Europe and ways in which CC can increase their reach. Participants included Lisette Kalshoven (Kennisland, Netherlands), Eneli Sutt (HITSA, Estonia), Teresa Nobre (Creative Commons Portugal), Valentina Pavel (APTI, Romania), Hans de Four (KlasCement, Belgium), Bardhyl Jashari (Metamorphosis, Macedonia), Ignasi Labastida y Juan (Universitat de Barcelona, Catalonia / Spain), Ivan Matejic (Creative Commons Serbia), Kamil Śliwowski (Centrum Cyfrowe, Poland) and John Weitzmann (Creative Commons Germany). The workshop was led by Alek Tarkowski from Creative Commons Poland, open policy advisor to CC and lead of this project.

OER workshop participants. Photo: Raimond Spekking / WikiMedia Commons, CC BY-SA (Source)

State of open education in Europe

We started with a session presenting the state of OER developments in EU countries, focusing particularly on public policies for open education. The session gave a good overview of the range of approaches to increasing adoption of OER: public e-textbook programs running in Poland and Macedonia; OER repositories such as Belgian Klascement, Dutch Wikiwijs, and Norwegian NDLA; “1 on 1” computer in school schemes used as entry channels for open content in Portugal or Macedonia; bottom-up hubs for open education communities such as German ZUM Wiki and the OER Champions project initiated in Macedonia.

We discussed the broader context for such initiatives, including national educational strategies and the specific shape of legal regulations–in particular copyright exceptions and limitations for educational use. In general, while there are very few functioning national-level policies supporting open education, there are multiple OER projects being implemented with public funding. Some are directly branded as “open education” projects, while others apply this philosophy without naming it that way.

Similarly, there are multiple initiatives at the European level, often funded by the European Union, that fit within the scope of the new initiative. The Open Education Europa portal has been developed on the basis of a previous e-learning portal. At the same time, projects that deal with ICTs in schools, e-learning, or quality of education are not necessarily aligned with OER issues. This means there might still be low awareness among key potential stakeholders. At the same time, there remains a great potential for gaining ICT allies in support of open education policy.

What kind of open education policy?

We spent part of the workshop discussing the concept of CC’s policy brief for open education in Europe. The basic policy position, achieved through a quick consensus among participants, can be summed up very easily: A free license like CC BY or CC BY-SA + (open formats, WCAG accessibility standards and metadata) should be adopted for all publicly funded educational content. (In other words, of all the varied definitions, the Hewlett Foundation OER definition is our definition of choice – and we’re happy that the new Open Education Europa portal sets a high standard by adopting CC BY as a default).

So while the basic policy rule is simple, the challenge lies in providing the best arguments for its widespread adoption. The workshop participants discussed essential elements of a successful policy brief. These should include:

  • A grounding both in rights issues, in particular the right to education and right to knowledge, but also in broader pedagogical theories, such as connectivism;

  • Proof that open education works, especially in economic terms; everyone knows this is not easy, often due to lack of data, but basic arguments can be made, especially about cost savings for parents and schools;

  • Evidence of existing OER projects and their scale and usage, including those that are not directly framed as “open education”, but follow the general model.

Finally, a challenge that any European educational policy faces is the limited scope in which the EU deals with educational issues, which are largely left in the hands of national governments and schooling systems. Other than a new Directive (which would be binding for EU member states, but also difficult to introduce), the EU could introduce an open education policy model to apply to its own funding of educational content. It could also work with national governments by promoting good examples and following best practices and standards. A policy brief needs to address the interdependence of EU- and national-level governmental bodies.

How to promote open education policy?

Policy matters are often difficult to understand beyond a narrow circle of policymakers, experts and stakeholders. During the workshops we discussed ways of making them easier to understand. We focused on three projects, two of which we’d like to work on in the coming months.

Teresa Nobre presented the concept of a study of European exceptions and limitations for education. These are rules defined in national copyright laws that allow for legal use of copyrighted content without permission under certain conditions for educational purposes. These vary greatly between countries and between K-12 and higher education. This “balkanization” of law is one of the reasons that open education, based of course on open licensing, is such an important policy alternative. We were initially considering conducting the necessary legal comparison, but we found out during the workshop that this has already been done by Prof. Raquel Xalabarder of Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (see the WIPO-commissioned analysis). Therefore, our work will build on this analysis and in particular “translate” it into an explanation that will apply to practical issues faced by educators in order to demonstrate the real-life application of policy decisions.

Kamil Śliwowski talked about a mythbusting approach, focusing on finding counter arguments for current criticisms of open education. Kamil described experiences we’ve had in Poland debating commercial educational publishers, who have been vocal critics of open education policy. These publishers often recite arguments against OER that are not based on evidence–hence, “myths”. The mythbusting approach began last year with a presentation at the UNESCO OER Congress in Paris, and continued with a workshop at the CC Summit in Buenos Aires. As part of this project, Kamil will organize in early 2014 a sprint-type workshop during which we’ll produce an OER mythbusting publication.

Bardhyl Jashari presented the idea of open education champions, which his organization, Foundation Metamorphosis, has been implementing in Macedonia. According to Bardhyl, leaders are crucial in promoting open education policy, since these issues are often difficult to understand for many on-the-ground educators. Empowering education champions to explain these topics makes the policies easier to understand. We agreed that it is a great idea, and in line with the recently appointed European “Digital Champions.” But these education champions will be difficult to implement without the Commission’s support.

Next steps

We are now starting work on our policy brief and related analyses and documents, and we’ll focus on developing these over the next few months. For early 2014, we are planning several events, culminating during Open Education Week in March.

We’re all the time looking for partners, collaborators and allies. if you care about open educational policy and want to help, please get in touch.

(Post icon: OER-Programm-Logo, Markus Büsges, CC BY-SA Unported)

PLOS ANNOUNCES FINALISTS FOR THE ACCELERATING SCIENCE AWARD PROGRAM

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PLOS is pleased to announce the six finalists for the Accelerating Science Award Program (ASAP).  The program recognizes the use of scientific research, published through Open Access, that has led to innovations benefiting society. Major sponsors include the Wellcome Trust and Google. Three top awards of US$30,000 each will be announced on October 21 in Washington, DC at an Open Access Week kickoff event hosted by the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) and the World Bank.

As award finalists, these individuals and teams are being honored for addressing a real-world challenge either by reusing previously published Open Access research or by creating a new repository of freely available research data to assist current and future collaborative research projects.  Open Access is the free, immediate online availability of articles, coupled with the rights to use these articles fully as long as the author and the original source are properly attributed.

“As these finalists illustrate, Open Access is good for science, good for business and good for the public, because it eliminates artificial constraints on the dissemination of research findings. This means that every student, every scientist and every citizen can benefit from any study published by Open Access done anywhere in the world,” said Elizabeth Marincola, Chief Executive Officer of PLOS. “The ASAP sponsors are proud to have received many worthy nominations. The six finalists embody the Open Access ethos by drawing on freely available research to create innovations that better society.”

The six finalists, along with the challenges they address and their innovative approaches, include:

  • HIV Self-Test Empowers Patients (Nitika Pant Pai, MD, MPH, PhD, Caroline Vadnais, Roni Deli-Houssein and Sushmita Shivkumar):  Worldwide it is estimated that as many as six in 10 HIV-infected individuals don’t know their HIV status and don’t seek testing. To increase awareness, knowledge and access to a convenient HIV screening option, and to expedite connections to treatment in nations hardest hit by the disease, Dr. Nitika Pant Pai and medical staff at McGill University and McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, developed a strategy based on the synergy of the Internet, an oral fluid–based self-test and a cell phone. This integrated approach included HIV education, an online test to determine HIV risk level, instructions for testing and interpreting the results, and confidential resources for referrals to trained counselors, support and healthcare workers. The tailored smartphone application, developed on the basis of original research published in multiple Open Access journals, helps circumvent the social visibility of testing in a healthcare facility. The application could alleviate fears of stigma and discrimination and make HIV detection simple and confidential.
  • Global Collaboration to Fight Malaria (Matthew Todd, PhD):  At least one child dies of malaria every minute of every day, mainly in Africa and Asia. According to Matthew Todd, who leads the Open Source Malaria Consortium in Sydney, Australia, given minimal financial incentives for pharmaceutical companies to develop new treatments and a high degree of suffering among the affected communities, a large-scale collaborative research model provides a solution. Todd turned publicly available data into a global effort to help identify new anti-malaria drugs.  He did this by creating an open-source collaborative involving scientists, college students and others from around the world. They use open online laboratory notebooks in which their experimental data is posted each day, enabling instant sharing and the ability to build on others’ findings in almost real time.  Todd’s Malaria Consortium could provide a model for researchers collaboratively tackling other daunting medical challenges, such as Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Smartphone Becomes Microscope (Saber Iftekhar Khan, Eva Schmid, PhD and Oliver Hoeller, PhD):  Science teachers often struggle to engage young students when their classroom experiences are limited to pre-prepared biological samples viewed through standard microscopes. Mr. Saber Khan, a middle school technology teacher, teamed up with University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco scientists Eva Schmid and Oliver Hoeller to develop a student-ready cell phone microscope, turning a clinical diagnostic tool into a portable device students and teachers could use as a mobile learning laboratory. To meet this challenge, Schmid and Hoeller drew on an Open Access article by global health researchers who’d invented the original cell phone microscope for use in remote clinical settings. With the adapted tool in hand, Khan’s middle school students collected and imaged samples in city parks, geotagged their locations and blogged about their results. Today, a traveling kit of cell phone microscopes has helped engage students from Hawaii to Austria.
  • Calculating Ecotourism Impact (Ralf Buckley, PhD, Guy Castley, PhD, Clare Morrison, PhD, Alexa Mossaz, Fernanda de Vasconcellos Pegas, Clay Alan Simpkins and Rochelle Steven): An obstacle hindering the efforts to make the case for ecotourism as a sound conservation policy is the lack of dollar value put on protected species by  policymakers and the public, especially in low- and middle income countries. Ralf Buckley and his team from the International Centre for Ecotourism Research in Queensland, Australia developed an innovative method for calculating the value of ecotourism for endangered animals, based on freely available data from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Calculations applied by Buckley’s team to endangered mammals, birds and frogs across the world, were published in Open Access publications in order to help publicly funded nature preserves make the most of their resources to protect and expand protected areas.
  • Measuring and Understanding the Sea (Mark J. Costello, PhD):  At a time when research shows 20,000 land and sea species to be directly threatened with extinction, marine ecologists are concerned they haven’t inventoried a vast number of oceanic species. Without this hard data, scientific knowledge and the potential effectiveness of conservation efforts are diminished. Dr. Mark Costello manages the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS), the largest real-time collaboration of species (taxonomic) experts and marine biologists in the world. Their work completed the naming of more than 200,000 known species, adding up to 2,000 new species every year. WoRMS is now the international standard for marine species nomenclature and is relied upon by a large number of institutions.  In addition, a collection of Open Access articles specifically utilized the WoRMs Register.
  • Visualizing Complex Science (Daniel Mietchen, PhD, Raphael Wimmer and Nils Dagsson Moskopp): Many aspects critical to understanding science, experiments and the natural world can only be described in words and diagrams  in a limited way. Good quality multimedia can help make that understanding easier. Daniel Mietchen and his group accessed articles in PubMed Central to help them create the Open Access Media Importer (OAMI), a bot that can scrape and download supplementary multimedia files from Open Access science articles, repositories and data stores.  The bot has uploaded more than 13,000 files to Wikimedia Commons and has been used in more than 135 English Wikipedia articles that together garnered more than three million views.

 

Photos and video interviews of the finalists can be found at https://sites.google.com/site/asaptoolkit/ . The six finalists will be narrowed down to three award recipients by an international committee composed of distinguished leaders in multiple fields, including:

  • Agnes Binagwaho, MD, Minister of Health, Rwanda and faculty member in the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School
  • Helga Nowotny, PhD, President of the European Research Council (ERC) and professor emeritus of Social Studies of Science, ETH Zurich
  • Tim O’Reilly, Founder and CEO, O’Reilly Media
  • Harold Varmus, MD, Nobel laureate, Co-founder of PLOS and the current Director of the National Cancer Institute

 

The ASAP program sponsors share a commitment to affect policy and public understanding to support the adoption of Open Access. They include the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL), the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), Co-Action Publishing, Copernicus Publications, Creative Commons, the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Doris Duke Charitable Trust, Electronic Information for Libraries (EIFL), eLife, Hindawi, Health Research Alliance (HRA), Howard Hughes Medical Institute, ImpactStory, Jisc, Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science, Mendeley, Microsoft Research, the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA), Research Councils UK (RCUK), Research Libraries UK (RLUK), Social Science Research Network (SSRN), the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), SURF (Netherlands), the World Bank, and major sponsors Google, PLOS and the Wellcome Trust.

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About the Public Library of Science

The Public Library of Science (PLOS) is a nonprofit publisher and advocacy organization founded to accelerate progress in science and medicine by leading a transformation in research communication. PLOS engages in outreach activities that promote Open Access and innovations in the communication of research. 2013 marks PLOS’s tenth anniversary as an Open Access publisher, reaching an international audience through immediate and free availability of research on the Internet. PLOS publishes a suite of journals: PLOS ONE, PLOS Biology, PLOS Medicine, PLOS Computational Biology, PLOS Genetics, PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases and PLOS Pathogens. PLOS ONE publishes research from more than 50 diverse scientific fields and is the largest peer-reviewed journal in the world.

 

About the Wellcome Trust

The Wellcome Trust is a global charitable foundation dedicated to achieving extraordinary improvements in human and animal health. It supports the brightest minds in biomedical research and the medical humanities. The Trust’s breadth of support includes public engagement, education and the application of research to improve health. It is independent of both political and commercial interests. www.wellcome.ac.uk

 

The post PLOS ANNOUNCES FINALISTS FOR THE ACCELERATING SCIENCE AWARD PROGRAM appeared first on The Official PLOS Blog.

Stay Unique – PLOS introduces ORCID Identifiers

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PLOS is pleased to announce the introduction of ORCID Identifiers to the people records in the manuscript submission system.

This update improves the accuracy of over 600,000 author and reviewer records. Matching researchers with their own work, and not that of someone else with the same or a similar name, is important because careers are built on these connections.

ORCID in PLOS submission system

After registering for an ORCID Identifier or inserting an existing one, Authors can build a professional profile by importing their work (articles, videos, conference abstracts) from the web or adding it manually.

Rebecca Bryant, Director of Community for ORCID said “ORCID is delighted to be working with PLOS.  Providing authors the opportunity to associate publications with their unique researcher identifier makes their work more discoverable and supports the open science goals of PLOS.”

Please update your EM information with an ORCID Identifier when submitting an article to PLOS.

The post Stay Unique – PLOS introduces ORCID Identifiers appeared first on The Official PLOS Blog.

The nordic Creative Commons filmfestival 2013 – visa, titta och dela film tillsammans

CC Sverige -

Jag sitter idag på premiären för den första nordiska creative commons filmfestivalen. En annorlunda filmfestival där alla som vill kan arrangera en filmvisning av en CC-licensierad film. Den är öppen för alla att delta i och du kan lätt arrangera en visning och delta. Kolla in manifestet för the Nordic Creative Commons filmfestival.

Vi kommer att arrangera en visning på .SE på onsdag den 4 sept av filmen Everywhere klockan 12.00. Den är öppen för alla och du är hjärtligt välkommen, men du måste anmäla dig i förväg. Anmälan sker genom följande formulär.

 

Overblik over danske filmfremvisninger i Nordic Creative Creative Commons Film Festival

CC Danmark -

Så er det idag at Nordic Creative Commons Film Festival løber af stablen, og frem til 8. september vil der i hele Norden og i resten af Europa være masser af filmfremvisninger med åbent licenserede film Skandinavien, dvs. film som bruger Creative Commons licenser til at nå et bredere publikum og inviterer publikummet til deling og remixing.

Filmfestivalen er bygget op således, at alle kan arrangere en fremvisning ved at vælge én eller flere film fra en liste med 40 film indenfor et vælg af genrer, udvalgt af filmfestivalen. Filmfremvisningerne kan foregår hvor som helst, og arrangørerne skal blot skaffe projektor, stole og et lokale. Med andre ord: Film indenfor eller udenfor biograferne – publikum bestemmer.

I Danmark er vi også godt med, og således er der 5 arrangementer annonceret i henholdsvis København og Aalborg (se liste nedenunder). Hvis man bor i København kan man også smutte over på den anden side af sundet og deltage i én eller flere af de 10 fremvisninger der er i Malmö og Lund.

Filmfestivalens danske program:

30. september 2013 kl. 19.30 - Platform4, Aalborg - (program)(Facebook event) (arrangør: KinoPlatform/Platform4)

3. september 2013 kl. 16.30 – Nordisk Kulturfond, København – (program) (arrangør: Nordisk Kulturfond)

4. september 2013 kl. 19.00 - 1000fryd, Aalborg - (program)(Facebook event)(arrangør: PeepShoppen/1000fryd/KinoPlatform)

4. september 2013 kl. 18.30 – 5e Kødbyen, København – (program)(Facebook event)(arrangør: Filmstationen, ROI, 5e & Creative Commons Danmark)

6. september 2013 kl. 20:30 - Videomøllen, København - (se program)(arrangør: Videomøllen)

Alle arrangementerne har fri entré, og ved åbningen i Aalborg i aften vil der endvidere efter filmene blive skruet op for lyd- og videoindtrykkene med et program af dj’s og vj’s. Læs mere om åbningsarrangementet her eller se Facebook eventet. Kig også hele det internationale program for festivalen her.

Deltag i gratis workshop
Som ekstra aktivitet kan man også komme bag kameraet og lære om at lave film. Film-communitiet KinoPlatform i Platform4 i Aalborg inviterer således til gratis videoproduktionsworkshop d. 1.-2. september. Her vil deltagere lære både at film og redigere film – læs mere (herunder hvordan man melder sig til) ved at klikke her.

Husk: Man kan stadigvæk sagtens nå at arrangere flere fremvisninger, og vi hører gerne fra andre som griber initiativet rundt omkring i landet. Skriv blot til os på info (a) creativecommons (dot) dk.

The post Overblik over danske filmfremvisninger i Nordic Creative Creative Commons Film Festival appeared first on Creative Commons Danmark.

New data source added to PLOS ALM

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We’re expanding the range of data sources in PLOS ALM to provide users with additional ways to evaluate the importance of research. F1000Prime recommendations now appear on 3000 highly influential PLOS articles (this number will grow as more articles are added).

Leading PLOS articles recommended by this new data source will feature the visual below, which includes a numerical score allocated to each review.

John Chodacki, Director of Product Management at PLOS said “Along with F1000Prime recommendations, researchers now have a diverse combination of metrics that more comprehensively evaluate the impact of an article.”

Increasing the range of PLOS ALM data sources helps tell a more complete story of how articles are used once they have been published – the F1000Prime metric is a new type in our suite, a qualitative recommendation, rather than a quantitative “share” or citation.

This valuable information can be shared with collaborators, institutions and funders to demonstrate the broader impact of research and helps guide readers to influential articles.

The post New data source added to PLOS ALM appeared first on The Official PLOS Blog.

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