Nyhetsinnsamler

School of Open Africa launch event in Kenya tomorrow!

Planet CC -

Following on the heels of School of Open Africa launch events in Tanzania and Nigeria last weekend, School of Open Kenya is hosting its own tomorrow to kick off training for four high schools in Nairobi. (SOO logo here. Earth icon licensed CC BY by Erin Standley from the Noun Project.) Called Popjam, this SOO […]

In advance, Share 2014 CCKorea Conference Content

Planet CC -

  2014 CCKOREA international Conference"Share Everything Connect Everything"Dear Participants of 2014 CCKorea Conference,   We would like to thank you for participating CCKorea Conference . The conference ended successfully thanks to your interest and participation!   For your convenience, conference-related articles, photos and vidoes will be updated on Conference Website, also Presentation materials can be found on the website and Below:1. Slide* Creativity- [Keynote] "Share Everything" / Ryan Merkley / CEO of Creative Commons- "Joyful digital playground: Maker Space" / Todd Porter/ Co-founder FabCafe Global- "Infinite Power of Creativity Shared work" / Jeongho Yeo / Korea Copyright Commission* Sharing City- [Keynote] “Designing City as Sharing Platform" / Kyung Min Kim / Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Seoul National University- Share Hub ”Drawing the NEXT CIty with Sharing” / Nanshil Kwon / CCKOREA- "The Sharing Economy and Its Impact on the Future of Cities" / Molly Turner / Director of Public Policy and Civic Partnership at Airbnb* Civic Hacking- (ready)[Keynote] "Connect Everyhing"/ Jay Yoon / Project lead of Creative Commons Korea- Code for Japan ”420 Techies for Namie” / Hal Seki / Code for Japan- (ready)"The Convergence of Art and Technology, public data" / Sey Min / Randomwalks- “Hacking the City with Technology” / Seung-hun Jang / Codenamu 2. . Video: https://vimeo.com/1063763533. Photo : https://www.flickr.com/photos/wowcckorea/sets/72157647330022998/4. Graphic Recording : drawing by Jinho Jung: https://www.flickr.com/photos/phploveme/sets/72157647600678046/5. Article- Bloter[현장] “공유를 공유하자”…CC코리아 글로벌 컨퍼런스저작권을, 정부를, 경제를 해킹하자- Mircosotfware[현장] "공유, 그 가치와 연결의 힘을 믿어요"... 2014 CC코리아 국제 컨퍼런스[현장 CCKorea 2014]동대문 창신동 프로젝트, ‘도시를 공유하자’ - Chosun Biz"저작물 공유할수록 가치 커져… CCL(Creative Commons License·저작물 이용 허락) 표시를"  Thank you again for taking your precious time to attend this conference, and we hope to seeyou again at our future conferences.   2014-09-19T08:30:45Z cc

Smart copying indeed!

Planet CC -

Smartcopying is the official guide to copyright issues for Australian schools and TAFE. Teachers and students can rely on the assistance of copyright law to copy the work of other people but the rules for use can be restrictive and…

School of Open Africa launch event in Kenya tomorrow!

Creativecommons.org -

Following on the heels of School of Open Africa launch events in Tanzania and Nigeria last weekend, School of Open Kenya is hosting its own tomorrow to kick off training for four high schools in Nairobi.


(SOO logo here. Earth icon licensed CC BY by Erin Standley from the Noun Project.)

Called Popjam, this SOO launch event + Mozilla Maker Party will be a day-long workshop introducing high school students to open educational resources (OER). Students will learn how to use OER and the open web to complement their academic studies. Students from four high schools will participate: Precious Blood Secondary School, Nairobi School, Sunshine Secondary School, and State House Girls Secondary School. SOO Kenya is hosted by Jamlab, a co-creation community based in Nairobi for high school students and graduates in Africa.

For more information about the event, and to RSVP if you’re in Nairobi, visit the event page.

About Maker Party

School of Open and Creative Commons is excited to be partnering with Mozilla to celebrate teaching and learning the web with Maker Party. Through thousands of community-run events around the world, Maker Party unites educators, organizations and enthusiastic Internet users of all ages and skill levels.

We share Mozilla’s belief that the web is a global public resource that’s integral to modern life: it shapes how we learn, how we connect and how we communicate. But many of us don’t understand its basic mechanics or what it means to be a citizen of the web. That’s why we’re supporting this global effort to teach web literacy through hands-on learning and making with Maker Party.

About the School of Open

The School of Open is a global community of volunteers focused on providing free education opportunities on the meaning, application, and impact of “openness” in the digital age and its benefit to creative endeavors, education, and research. Volunteers develop and run courses, workshops, and real world training programs on topics such as Creative Commons licenses, open educational resources, and sharing creative works. The School of Open is coordinated by Creative Commons and P2PU.

We’re Hiring Workshop Facilitators

Planet CC -

Creative Commons Aotearoa New Zealand is looking for casual workshop facilitators based in  Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin. Creative Commons is helping to roll out open policy to every school, research and heritage institution is New Zealand — but to do this, we’re going to need some help. We’re looking for confident, articulate candidates who […]

Festival de Cine CC CMX

Planet CC -

Del 02 al 07 de septiembre de 2013, Ciudad de México. Proyección de películas y cortometrajes nacionales e internacionales bajo licencias Creative Commons. Mesas de trabajo y talleres para reflexionar sobre la Propiedad Intelectual e Internet. Conformación de un circuito universitario con la Facultad de Filosofía y Letras de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, el Museo Universitario del Chopo, el Colegio Madrid, la Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana en sus planteles Azcapotzalco y Xochimilco y la Escuela Nacional de Artes Plásticas. Toda la información del evento en ésta liga

Why are we prosecuting students for sharing knowledge?

Planet CC -

In July the Electronic Frontier Foundation wrote about the predicament that Colombian student Diego Gomez found himself in after he shared a research article online. Gomez is a graduate student in conservation and wildlife management at a small university. He has generally poor access to many of the resources and databases that would help him […]

Why are we prosecuting students for sharing knowledge?

Creativecommons.org -

In July the Electronic Frontier Foundation wrote about the predicament that Colombian student Diego Gomez found himself in after he shared a research article online. Gomez is a graduate student in conservation and wildlife management at a small university. He has generally poor access to many of the resources and databases that would help him conduct his research. Paltry access to useful materials combined with a natural culture of sharing amongst researchers prompted Gomez shared a paper on Scribd so that he and others could access it for their work. The practice of learning and sharing under less-than-ideal circumstances could land Diego in prison.

The EFF reports that upon learning of this unauthorized sharing, the author of the research article filed criminal complaint against Gomez. The charges lodged against Diego could put him in prison for 4-8 years. The trial has started, and the court will need to take into account several factors: including whether there was any malicious intent to the action, and whether there was any actual harm against the economic rights of the author.

Today EFF, Creative Commons, Right to Research Coalition, and Open Access Button are launching a campaign to help raise awareness about Diego’s situation, to promote a reasonable handling of his and similar cases, and to support open access policies and practices. We hope you’ll sign on.

Let’s stand together to promote Open Access worldwide.

Help Diego Gomez and join academics and users in fighting outdated laws and practices that keep valuable research locked up for no good reason.

Diego Gomez, a Colombian graduate student, currently faces up to eight years in prison for doing something thousands of researchers do every day: posting research results online for those who would not otherwise have a way to access them.

If open access were the default for scholarly communication, cases like Diego’s would become obsolete.

Academic research would be free to access and available under an open license that would legally enable the kind of sharing that is so crucial for enabling scientific progress.

When research is shared freely and openly, we all benefit. Sign the petition to express your support for Open Access as the default for scientific and scholarly publishing, so researchers like Diego don’t risk severe penalties for helping colleagues access the research they need.

Sign-on statement:
Scientific and scholarly progress relies upon the exchange of ideas and research. We all benefit when research is shared widely, freely, and openly. I support an Open Access system for academic publishing that makes research free for anyone to read and re-use; one that is inclusive of all and doesn’t force researchers like Diego Gomez to risk severe penalties for helping colleagues access the research they need.

Kan CC-licens hjælpe med at opfylde Nationalmuseets mission?

CC Danmark -

Dette er en gæsteblogpost skrevet af Nationalmuseets Jacob Riddersholm Wang, digitaliseringsansvarlig, og Charlotte S. H. Jensen, udviklingskonsulent.

Igennem snart 3 år har Nationalmuseet arbejdet på at tilgængeliggøre en del af sin fotosamling. CC-licensering er ét af de væsentlige og strategiske elementer i bestræbelserne på at gøre kulturarven tilgængelig – og brugbar. Opgaven er ikke helt så enkel som den lyder.

Nationalmuseet har i virkeligheden flere forskellige fotoarkiver, med udspring i de forskellige samlinger, fx ”Oldtid”, ”Nyere Tid”, Etnografisk Samling” og så videre. I alt 9 forskellige samlinger rummer pt. ca. 700.000 billeder i museets fotoregistreringsdatabase, og hertil kommer samlingerne i de museer, som først for nyligt er blevet en del af Nationalmuseets organisation, samt billeder der endnu ikke er scannede.

700.000 billeder lyder måske ikke af så meget, men der er tale om enkelte objekter, der skal ”håndteres” individuelt, og som hver især har sit eget, unikke sæt af metadata. Desuden er de enkelte billeders ophav og indhold voldsomt forskellige: Nogle er taget af museets egne fotografer og forestiller museets egne genstande, andre er taget af ukendte fotografer og overdraget af fx arvinger eller ”findere”, nogle er taget af professionelle fotografer – andre er tværtimod tydeligt ældre amatørfotografier…. og så videre. En yderligere udfordring er, at nogle fotografier kan være forsynet med særlige klausuler. Fx at billederne ikke må bruges uden giverens tilladelse el.lign.

Én af de store opgaver i Nationalmuseets tilgængeliggørelsesprojekt er derfor arbejdet med at finde frem til, hvilke licenser, de enkelte billeder kan forsynes med. En del er ”All Rights reserved” – det kan fx være fotos, som er købt af eksterne fotografer. Det andet yderpunkt er fotografier, der så gamle, at de for længst er i Public Domain. For de billeder, som Nationalmuseet selv har rettighederne til, er licensen BY-SA. Billederne skal kunne anvendes til alle formål, også kommercielle, og vi har selvfølgelig skelet til, at BY-SA licensen muliggør brug på fx Wikipedia. I skrivende stund er der tilgængeliggjort 46.000 fotos, og heraf er ca. 36.000 licenseret med BY-SA.

Men for at kunne bruge fotoarkivernes indhold er det ikke nok, at licenserne tillader videreudnyttelse. Det skal også være enkelt at finde frem til netop de billeder, som man søger. Derfor forestiller vi os ikke, at det er Nationalmuseets egen website, som skal udgøre den primære indgang. Tværtimod opfatter vi Googles billedsøgning og andre lignende tjenester som den primære grænseflade for brugere, som søger…. og forhåbentlig finder.

Der er flere forskellige ideer og udviklingsplaner på bedding. Fælles for dem er, at de udspringer af en grundlæggende idé om, at det skal være nemt at finde og bruge – men også med tiden: at bidrage med den viden, man måtte have om enkelte billeder og deres motiver. Derfor er bl.a. mulighed for geotagging og kommentar blandt de features, som er i støbeskeen. Men vi starter småt – allerførst gælder det om at få indholdet i luften, så vi gennem brug og brugerønsker kan komme tættere på, hvordan tjenesten skal udvikles.

Nationalmuseets overordnede mission er, at Nationalmuseet rummer og udvikler forudsætningerne for, at alle kan få indsigt i kulturhistorien”. At ”alle” skal kunne få indsigt i kulturhistorien er et temmeligt ambitiøst projekt, og en opgave, som ingen institution – end ikke Nationalmuseet – kan løse alene. Hvis ”alle” derimod har en mulighed for både at finde frem til og at bruge kulturhistoriske fotos til egne formål, bliver opgaven en smule mere overkommelig.

Samlinger.natmus.dk er online, men sitens åbning markeres officielt 8. oktober, hvor vi regner med at have passeret et rundt tal og have over 50.000 fotos online.

The post Kan CC-licens hjælpe med at opfylde Nationalmuseets mission? appeared first on Creative Commons Danmark.

Daily awesome from the internet: CC presents the Thing of the Day

Planet CC -

When you go searching for Creative Commons–licensed content, you never know what you’ll find. Sometimes you’ll find the exact photo or piece of sound you were looking for, and sometimes you’ll find something you never could have imagined. We’ve created a new Tumblr blog to celebrate those unusual, beautiful, and quirky CC finds from around […]

Hey, CC musicians! Enter the Free! Music! Contest!

Planet CC -

Every year, our friends at Musikpiraten e.V. host the Free! Music! Contest to find the best Creative Commons–licensed music of the year. CC is proud to serve as a partner in this awesome tradition. This year, anyone who preorders the album of winning selections earns the right to vote for their favorite entries. From the […]

Przegląd linków CC #149

Planet CC -

Otwarta edukacja 1. Grywalizacja. Zrób to sam! To najnowsza, otwarta (na licencji CC BY-SA) książka powstała dzięki Fundacji Orange i Laboratorium EE. Tytuł wszystko tłumaczy, a poza książką dostępne są również arkusze ułatwiające zaprojektowanie własnych elementów grywalizacyjnych do różnych projektów. Książkę można pobrać lub zamówić w drukowej wersji (edycja limitowana). 2. Można już zgłaszać propozycję wystąpień na kolejną edycję […]

Daily awesome from the internet: CC presents the Thing of the Day

Creativecommons.org -

When you go searching for Creative Commons–licensed content, you never know what you’ll find. Sometimes you’ll find the exact photo or piece of sound you were looking for, and sometimes you’ll find something you never could have imagined.

We’ve created a new Tumblr blog to celebrate those unusual, beautiful, and quirky CC finds from around the web. It’s the Creative Commons Thing of the Day!

Sign up to get the Thing of the Day delivered to your inbox every morning.

Here’s the last week and a half in Thing of the Day.

Italic Shelf / Ronen Kadushin / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

Ronen Kadushin designs unusual pieces of furniture like this unorthodox bookcase. He shares the designs under Creative Commons licenses and invites people to experiment with them, adapt them, and share their modified versions. Kadushin writes, “An open design value is increased with wider modification possibilities and transformation potentials into other products. Designs that typically live only a few years in the marketplace can live on and develop into new shapes and uses.”

Buy My Bed in Brooklyn / Jonathan Mann / CC BY 3.0

Jonathan Mann writes a song every day. Many of them tackle complex emotions and ideas. But inevitably, a lot of them are just silly, like “Buy My Bed in Brooklyn.” In songs like “Buy My Bed,” we see a songwriter whose talent lies in his childlike approach to day-to-day life.

On why he licenses all his music under CC, Jonathan told us, “It’s kind of a no-brainer… I don’t even really understand why anyone would do anything different. It makes such simple sense.”

Coming Out Simulator / Nicky Case / CC0

Nicky Case creates videogames that deal with issues many videogame designers wouldn’t touch. Nicky’s Nothing to Hide is a frank look at government and corporate surveillance, and an addictive puzzle game to boot.

Coming Out Simulator is a semiautobiographical game about Nicky coming out of the closet to their parents. The player is given choices of what to say, but the heartwrenching ending is inevitable.

Andrew Archer / CC BY-NC 3.0

Illustrator Andrew Archer drew these terrifying images of a post-apocalyptic California for a feature in California Magazine.

Found in Translation / Anjaya Iyer / CC BY-NC-ND 3.0

These gorgeous prints feature words that capture ideas and feelings we’ve all experienced, but that don’t translate well into English. By introducing such perfect words to English speakers, they serve as a testament to the way that languages constantly grow, adapt, and borrow words from each other.

Copyright / XKCD / CC BY-NC 2.5

It even happens to us some days.

프라하 까를교 악사 / Miyoung Yi / CC BY 2.0

Miyoung Yi’s gorgeous drawings capture everyday moments, both in her home country of South Korea and around the world. As a Creative Commons activist, she encourages other Koreans to consider sharing their work under open licenses.

Steven Lewis / CC0

Here at CC, we’re huge fans of the photography blog Unsplash. The blog presents a single photo every day – the Unsplash curators have a great eye for delightful slices of life. The best part is that all of the photos are available under the CC0 Public Domain Dedication, meaning that anyone can use them for any purpose, commercial or noncommercial, with or without attribution.

Silhouettes / The OO-Ray / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

Illustration: Broken window / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

The OO-Ray’s Silhouettes is a great example of how Creative Commons–licensed work can take on a life of its own. The OO-Ray (né Ted Laderas) composed and recorded the piece in 2011. Since then, it’s appeared in dozens of videos thanks to its CC license. As Laderas told SoundCloud, “It’s incredibly energizing to see that people like your music so much to include it in their video.”

Hey, CC musicians! Enter the Free! Music! Contest!

Creativecommons.org -

Every year, our friends at Musikpiraten e.V. host the Free! Music! Contest to find the best Creative Commons–licensed music of the year. CC is proud to serve as a partner in this awesome tradition.

This year, anyone who preorders the album of winning selections earns the right to vote for their favorite entries. From the announcement:

“With the public voting we want to achieve two things,” explains Christian Hufgard, chairman of the Musikpiraten. “On the one hand, the selection of songs on the CDs are placed on a broader footing. And the obvious choice is to give a voice to those who will hear the CDs afterwards? But we also hope that the participating bands indicate their fans even before publication of the sampler the competition and we still get the more attention.”

Additionally, German gothic rock band Aeon Sable is offering a special prize for remixing its song “Visions,” which the band has shared a multitrack version of under CC BY-NC.

Submissions are due September 30. Check it out!

[免費活動] 紀錄片《網路之子》協力翻譯工坊

Planet CC -

與Mozilla 台灣社群(MozTW)協力舉辦本活動,邀集民眾打造紀錄片「The Internet's Own Boy」繁體體中文字幕,協力字幕內容亦將以創用CC授權釋出。 「The Internet's Own Boy」是出爐不到半年、廣受網路界好評的紀錄片,藉由亞倫•斯沃茨 (Aaron Swartz),這位身兼多個身份,程式設計師和倡議行動者的故事,討論資訊自由的公民權益議題。 2014-09-13T09:48:02Z emyleo

Creative Commons launches School of Open events in Tanzania and Nigeria

Planet CC -

Today and tomorrow the School of Open launches in Tanzania and Nigeria in conjunction with Mozilla Maker Party! (SOO logo here. Earth icon licensed CC BY by Erin Standley from the Noun Project.) In Tanzania, CC Tanzania is hosting a creative event for kids at the Open University of Tanzania, the first university in the […]

Creative Commons launches School of Open events in Tanzania and Nigeria

Creativecommons.org -

Today and tomorrow the School of Open launches in Tanzania and Nigeria in conjunction with Mozilla Maker Party!


(SOO logo here. Earth icon licensed CC BY by Erin Standley from the Noun Project.)

In Tanzania, CC Tanzania is hosting a creative event for kids at the Open University of Tanzania, the first university in the region to offer open and distant learning programs. Kids will use the Internet and open educational resources to create animations. This event occurs today: see the Maker Party page for details. It marks the launch of three training programs around ICT empowerment training for unemployed youth, teaching persons with disabilities how to use computers, and training educators on using ICT to improve how they teach their students.

In Nigeria, CC Nigeria is hosting a web building skills event for the public at the Nigerian Institute for Advanced Legal Studies at the University of Lagos. Anyone may join to learn how to build the web and share creative works through Mozilla and CC tools. The opening ceremony and maker party are tomorrow, see the Maker Party page for details. The event also marks the launch of a five-week training program around Nigerian copyright and Linux Operating System. During the opening ceremony, SOO Nigeria’s facilitators, partners and supporters will meet and set expectations for program participants. See the School of Open Nigeria page for more details. You can follow SOO Nigeria on Facebook and Twitter, using the hashtags #SOOAfrica and #MakerParty.

School of Open launch events are also set to occur in Kenya and South Africa — stay tuned! (Read more about their plans here.)

About Maker Party

School of Open and Creative Commons is excited to be partnering with Mozilla to celebrate teaching and learning the web with Maker Party. Through thousands of community-run events around the world, Maker Party unites educators, organizations and enthusiastic Internet users of all ages and skill levels.

We share Mozilla’s belief that the web is a global public resource that’s integral to modern life: it shapes how we learn, how we connect and how we communicate. But many of us don’t understand its basic mechanics or what it means to be a citizen of the web. That’s why we’re supporting this global effort to teach web literacy through hands-on learning and making with Maker Party.

About the School of Open

The School of Open is a global community of volunteers focused on providing free education opportunities on the meaning, application, and impact of “openness” in the digital age and its benefit to creative endeavors, education, and research. Volunteers develop and run courses, workshops, and real world training programs on topics such as Creative Commons licenses, open educational resources, and sharing creative works. The School of Open is coordinated by Creative Commons and P2PU.

Time is running out: We all need to support a fair and neutral Internet

Planet CC -

Today a large group of companies and organizations are raising awareness about the importance of net neutrality by joining the Internet Slowdown campaign. The action asks what would happen if large internet service providers (ISPs) and cable companies get their way and are able to squash net neutrality. Net neutrality is the concept that ISPs should […]

Time is running out: We all need to support a fair and neutral Internet

Creativecommons.org -

Today a large group of companies and organizations are raising awareness about the importance of net neutrality by joining the Internet Slowdown campaign. The action asks what would happen if large internet service providers (ISPs) and cable companies get their way and are able to squash net neutrality. Net neutrality is the concept that ISPs should treat all data that travels over their networks equally. In the United States, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has proposed a framework for “Protecting and Promoting the Open Internet.” But to many companies and users the guidelines are inadequate for truly supporting an open internet. Instead, some think that the FCC proposal props the door open for ISPs to offer internet “fast lanes” to customers who can pay more–thus breaking the principle of network neutrality.

Creative Commons licenses and public domain tools support access and reuse of hundreds of millions of pieces of creative work by allowing creators to attach rights information about how they wish to share their creativity. And of course, open licensing is just one part of the ecosystem of sharing. CC helps break down copyright barriers to online sharing, but without net neutrality, the sharing of all works (both CC licensed and not) will be restricted from the users who cannot cough up the money to jump into the fast lane. Creators should be able to share content on equal footing. And users should be able to access and reuse that shared content via a fair and open internet.

The FCC has been soliciting feedback from the public. You can support the campaign for net neutrality at Battle for the Net and sign the letter which will be sent to your members of Congress, the FCC, and the White House. And you can still have your voice heard by sending your comments to the FCC. The public comment period ends on 15 September.

NOU 2014:5 om MOOC er publisert

Planet CC -

MOOC-utvalgets rapport er nå publisert som NOU 2014:5 - MOOC til Norge: Nye digitale læringsformer i høyere utdanning. MOOC står for «Massive Open Online Courses» og er en undervisningsvorm basert på åpne læringsressurser som er tilgjengelig over Internett. NOUen inneholder to notater som blant annet drøfter bruk av Creative Commons: «Opphavsrett ved tradisjonell undervisning og ved MOOC» av Olav Torvund «Rettighetshåndtering og lisensiering av læremidler ved MOOC» av Gisle Hannemyr. MOOC-kua av ZML-Innovative Learning Scenarios Fachhochschule Joanneum, basert på la vaca de los sinvaca av José Bogado. Tilgjengelig under CC BY-NC 4.0 Lisens. 2014-09-09T05:31:30Z Gisle Hannemyr

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